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MSHS COURSE GUIDE

ACADEMIC & CAREER COUNSELING

The counselors will assist students in planning their high school schedules to meet graduation requirements and entry into educational programs, the military, and employment after high school. Students should give careful consideration to course selections for next year. Students who needs assistance in planning their schedule should make an appointment to see their counselor.

It is the responsibility of students and their parent to ensure that the student takes and completes all requirements for graduation, college admission, NCAA eligibility or other programs. Students who have failed a semester of any class should check with their counselor to ensure that they meet graduation requirements.

Course registration for the next year occurs in January. It is recommended that students choose classes carefully since schedule changes are made on a space-available basis after initial registration. When school starts in August, students will be required to have both parent/guardian and teacher signatures to add or drop a course.

PERSONAL COUNSELING

The counselors, social worker, and behavior interventionist are available for personal counseling with students.

ACADEMIC CREDIT

  • One-half academic credit is issued for each semester of an academic course when the semester grade is ‘D-’ or higher. (Junior Advisory SAT Prep Class is .25 credit).
  • Driver Education, Physical Education (PE) and Action Education are not considered academic courses. PE and Action Education receive .25 credit per semester. A student does not receive academic credit for Driver Education, but will receive .25 credit when combined with nine weeks of PE. CLICK HERE to view the PE graduation requirement.
  • Students must take at least four academic courses and Physical Education each semester. Students are encouraged to take six academic courses each semester.
  • Students are not required to take PE during the semester they are initially enrolled in Health.

INCOMPLETE GRADES

  • Incomplete grades (‘I’) must be made up within five school days after the end of the semester.
  • Students who does not complete make-up work could receive an ‘F’ for the semester.
  • An ‘I’ (Incomplete) will be treated as an ‘F’ for determining athletic eligibility.

INCORRECT GRADES

Students who believe they have received an incorrect semester exam grade or semester grade on the report card must discuss this concern with their course instructor within three school days after the grade reports have been distributed. If it determined that an error has been made, the instructor is responsible for contacting the schol registrar to adjust the grade.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To participate in the Mahomet-Seymour High School graduation ceremony, students must complete all requirements for graduation prior to the graduation date. A student must earn at least 20 academic credits including the course requirements listed below:

  • Four years of English, which must include:
    • English 1, 2 and 3 (year long courses)
    • Speech Communication
    • One semester of an English elective course
  • Three years of Math.
  • Two years of Science, including Biology.
  • Two years of Social Studies, which must include:
    • One year of US History or AP US History and successful completion of the US and Illinois Constitution tests
    • Two semesters of Social Studies electives (Including Civics for the Class of 2020 and beyond)
  • Consumer Education – can be met by one of the following classes:
    • Consumer Education (11 or 12)
    • Economics (12)
    • Agribusiness Management (11 or 12)
  • One semester of Health
  • One year of Career Education (Agriculture, Business, Family and Consumer Science, Technology), or World Language, or Fine Arts (Art, Drama, Music)
  • Advisory Test Prep (11)
  • PE (1/4 credit per semester)
    • PE is required each semester except:
      • The semester a student takes Health
      • During the 11th and 12th grade for ongoing participation in an interscholastic athletic program or marching band
    • The following rules apply to PE waivers:
      • Students will be waived from PE at the time their activity starts and remain exempt for the remaining duration of the semester when the activity ends
      • Students enrolled in PE must have approval from the PE instructor to waive out (based on current status in the class)
      • Failure to return to PE if the sport, band, or dance is dropped will result in a failing grade for each day missed, and the student could fail PE for the quarter and the semester
      • Juniors and seniors may NOT waive PE if the waiver would give the student a third study hall
      • Students who waive PE do not receive .25 credit and should stay mindful of the graduation credit requirements

EARLY GRADUATION

Students participating in early graduation must:

  • Meet all state and local graduation requirements
  • Have the written permission of a parent or guardian to graduate early
  • Return a completed Early Graduation Form to the Guidance Office

Students who graduate early will have the following responsibilities and privileges:

  • Early graduates may not participate in any extra-curricular activities (band, chorus, athletics, plays, prom court, etc.) during the spring semester
  • Early graduates may attend school functions during the spring semester. If early graduates cause problems at any school activity, they will lose the privilege of attending any future school activity, including graduation
  • Early graduates will be responsible for seeing that their caps and gowns for graduation are ordered at the appropriate time. Failure to order a cap and gown will result in the student not participating in the graduation ceremony
  • For early graduates to participate in the graduation ceremony, they must attend graduation practice in May. Failure to attend graduation practice will result in the student not being allowed to participate in the graduation ceremony
  • Early graduates who plan on starting college in January of their senior year should apply for state and federal financial aid during their junior year

SCHEDULE CHANGES

  • Students must meet with their counselor to get a Schedule Change Request Form. This form, with the appropriate signatures, must be returned to the Guidance Office.
  • Courses dropped may be replaced with another course within the first week of each semester (two weeks with teacher approval).
  • Students may not drop a required course or a course that is their fourth academic subject. Students may drop an elective course without it appearing on their transcript any time within the first nine weeks of each semester.
  • Students who drop an elective course after the first nine weeks of the semester will have a failing grade entered on their transcript as the semester grade for that course.
  • Students must pass the first semester of a year-long elective course in order to take the second semester.
  • COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS: It is your responsibility to notify the college you plan to attend and the NCAA Eligibility Center of schedule change(s) during your senior year.

STUDY HALL WAIVER POLICY

  • Juniors and seniors may be excused from 1st and/or 7th period study hall
  • The student and parent/guardian must sign the Study Hall Waiver Form and agree to each of the conditions on the form.
  • Study hall waivers are a privilege and can be revoked.

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION

Alternative education provides a different way for Mahomet-Seymour High School Juniors and Seniors to earn their high school diploma. Students in the program take courses in a computer-based learning environment and in a 30 minute classroom environment. General students must attend school for 5 hours per day and arrive no later than 9:09 am. Work students must attend school for 3 hours per day and arrive no later than 9:09 am. Students should speak with their counselor if interested in alternative education.

PARKLAND COLLEGE COURSES

  • Students must be 15 years old, a junior, and have written permission from a counselor before enrolling in a class at Parkland College.
  • Students who pass a three, four or five semester hour class at Parkland may receive one-half (1/2) academic credit toward graduation from Mahomet-Seymour High School.

INDIVIDUALIZED TRANSITION PLANNING

Individualized transition planning is a longitudinal planning process that may begin at age 14.5 for students with disabilities. It considers the transition goals of employment, post secondary education, and independent living. Students with disabilities who do not receive supportive services at Mahomet Seymour High School may request transition planning. Inquiries may be directed to Mrs. Christine Northrup, Director of Special Education, at 586-4947.

WORK/MILITARY SERVICE

Students who plans to work or enter military service after graduation should meet with their counselor to discuss opportunities in each of these areas.

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS

The majority of four-year colleges and universities in the United States require at least the following high school courses for admission:

  • Four years of English
  • Three years of Social Studies
  • Three years of Mathematics, including Algebra 1 or Algebra 1A and 1B, Algebra 2, and Geometry or Trigonometry
  • Three years of Laboratory Science
  • Two years of electives in world language
  • The minimum course requirements for admission to the four-year state-supported universities in Illinois can be found HERE.

College admission requirements may change and all programs within a university may not have the same admission standards (required high school courses, class rank, ACT or SAT I score, and SAT II subject tests). The ACT or SAT is required by most four-year colleges and universities in Illinois and for Parkland College Health Career programs. Some schools require both the SAT I and SAT II. See your counselor if you have any questions concerning college admission requirements.

NCAA ELIGIBILITY

To participate in Division I or Division II sports:

  • Students must meet eligibility standards (core courses, GPA, ACT/SAT scores).
  • Students must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center (fall of Senior year).
  • Students must have ACT or SAT test results sent directly to the Eligibility Center by marking code 9999 in the section on college and scholarship code choices in their ACT or SAT registration folder.
  • Students who have tested more than once should have all of their ACT or SAT I test scores sent to the Eligibility Center. NCAA regulations permit the Eligibility Center to take the highest score a student has earned on each part of a test to produce an ACT composite or SAT I combined score, which may be higher than the score he or she has earned on any single test date.
  • Visit the NCAA website for information concerning core courses and required GPA and ACT/SAT scores for eligibility.

FINANCIAL AID FOR COLLEGE

  • Juniors who plan to be early graduates next year and attend college or career/technical school in January of their senior year should apply during their junior year for state and federal financial aid.
  • A student who will graduate in May of their senior year and plans to attend a college the following August should apply for state and federal financial aid in the fall of their senior year.
  • Financial aid applications (FAFSA) are available HERE.

TRANSCRIPTS

To have a transcript mailed to a college or university, the NCAA, an employer, the military, etc., studens must complete a transcript request form. Federal law requires that we have a student’s written permission to mail a transcript. Allow ten days for mailing. Transcript requests may be submitted to MSHS registrar, Mrs. Amy Shore.

HONORS/ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

Honors and Advanced Placement courses are designed for high-ability, high-achieving students who want to be challenged and to enhance their critical thinking and critical analysis skills. Students in AP courses should expect to read and write more, analyze materials, synthesize ideas, solve problems and evaluate. The level of performance in these courses will be demanding and much above that of students in a regular course.

Advanced Placement courses follow the course content as outlined by the College Board. These courses provide the most ambitious students the challenging opportunity to study college level courses while in high school.

Satisfactory performance on the optional College Board Advanced Placement exam in May could potentially allow students to gain advanced standing and/or credit in college. College credit may vary by college and by college major. Students are encouraged to investigate the Advanced Placement policy of the college of their choice.

HONOR POINTS

  • Honor points are given for Honors or AP classes where a grade of ‘C-’ or higher is earned.
  • Honors points are used in calculation of GPA and class rank.
  • Numerical values are assigned to grades (including pluses and minuses).
  • The regular GPA and the honor points are combined using a multiplier based on the number of semesters completed.
  • Transfer students will receive honor points only in classes that are similarly offered at MSHS.
  • Visit the GPA section of the guidance website for more detailed information.

ACADEMIC LETTERS

The Mahomet-Seymour Schools Foundation for Educational Excellence and the MSHS PTO sponsor the academic letters to promote, encourage and honor academic excellence. Academic letters are awarded on a yearly basis to students who meet the following criteria:

  • Enrolled in a minimum of five academic courses each semester. This does not include summer school, PE, Action Ed, Driver Ed, or Junior SAT Prep.
  • GPA of 3.6 / 4.0 (freshmen/sophomores) or 3.8 / 4.0 (juniors/seniors) for the entire academic school year
  • No D’s or F’s for the entire academic school year which includes PE, Action Ed, Driver Ed and Junior SAT Prep
  • Seniors who graduate at the end of first semester are not eligible.
  • Transfer students must complete one semester at MSHS and meet all other criteria.

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY

Juniors and Seniors are eligible for the National Honor Society if they meet the following criteria:

  • 3.6 / 4.0 cumulative GPA
  • Completed application
  • Attendance at the induction ceremony

HONOR CORDS

There is a fee for students who want to purchase honor cords to wear at graduation. Honor cords are awarded to graduating seniors for the following:

  • National Honor Society (navy blue, gold)
  • French Honor Society (red, white, blue)
  • Spanish Honor Society (red, gold)
  • International Thespian Society (royal blue, gold)
  • “Quill & Scroll” Journalism Honor Society (royal blue, gold)
  • Student Council (light blue, white)
  • FMP Mentors (green, white)
  • Top Ten – gold stoles

ADVISORY PERIOD

Advisory is a 25 minute period between 3rd and 4th periods. Students are assigned advisories by grade level or academic needs. Juniors participate in a mandatory graded SAT prep class during advisory.

FRESHMEN MENTORING PROGRAM - All Freshmen participate in a special program designed to aid in a successful transition to high school both academically and socially. The freshman advisory program has junior and senior mentors who guide various activities.

HONORS POINTS SEQUENCE

To obtain maximum honors points, students should consider the following course sequences:

Grade Class Credit
English    
9 English 1 (Honors) 1
9-10 Speech Communication 1/2
10 English 2 (Honors) 1
11 English 3 (Honors) 1
12 College Preparatory Writing (Honors) 1/2
12 British Literature (Honors) 1/2
12 AP English Literature and Composition 1
     
Math    
8 Algebra 1  
9 Geometry (Honors) 1
10 Algebra 2 (Honors) 1
11 Pre-Calculus (Honors) 1
11-12 AP Calculus BC 1
11-12 Statistics (Honors) 1/2
11-12 Trigonometry (Honors) 1/2
     
Social Studies    
10-12 Government & Law 2 (Honors) 1/2
11 AP U.S. History 1
10-12 Sociology (Honors) 1/2
10-12 Economics (Honors) 1/2
10-12 AP Economics 1
     
Science    
9 Biology 1
10 Chemistry 1 1
11-12 Chemistry 2 (Honors) 1/2
11-12 Physics 1
11-12 AP Biology 1
11-12 AP Chemistry 1
11-12 AP Physics 1
     
World Language    
9 French 1 / French 2 or Spanish 1 / Spanish 2 1
10 French 2 / French 3 (H) or Spanish 2 / Spanish 3 (H) 1
11 French 3 (H) / French 4 (H) or Spanish 3 (H) / Spanish 4 (H) 1
12 French 4 (H) or Spanish 4 (H) 1
12 AP French Language & Culture 1
12 AP Spanish Language & Culture 1

ATHLETICS, EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES, AND ELIGIBILITY

IHSA Boys' Sports

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Track
  • Wrestling

IHSA Girls' Sports

  • Basketball
  • Competitive Cheer
  • Competitive Dance
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Activities and Organizations

  • Art Club
  • Chess Club / Team
  • Color Guard (Band / Choir)
  • Drama Club
  • FBLA (Business)
  • FFA (Agriculture)
  • French Club
  • Interact Club (Rotary service club)
  • Intramural Basketball (boys and girls)
  • Jazz / Pep Band
  • Madrigals (Choir)
  • Math Team
  • Pin Pals (Wrestling score keepers)
  • Scholastic Bowl
  • Spanish Club
  • Speech Team
  • Student Council
  • WYSE (Science / Engineering)

Honorary Organizations

  • French Honor Society
  • International Thespian Society (Drama)
  • National Honor Society
  • Quill and Scroll (Yearbook)
  • Spanish Honor Society

ATHLETIC/EXTRA-CURRICULAR ELIGIBILITY

In order to be eligible to participate in any high school sponsored or high school supported athletic sport or extra-curricular activity, students must satisfy the Mahomet-Seymour School District’s scholastic standing requirements. PE counts as an academic class for IHSA and eligibility purposes. The standards are:

  • Students must have passed 5 academic classes the previous semester.
  • Students must be passing 5 academic classes.
  • Students receiving two D’s and an ‘F’ in another class will be ineligible.
  • Students receiving two F’s will be ineligible.
  • Grades, for eligibility purposes, are cumulative for a semester.
  • Action Education is not counted towards academic eligibility.

Participant students who fail to meet these academic criteria will be ineligible to participate for seven calendar days or until the specific academic criteria are met -- whichever is longer.

If you have any questions concerning your athletic/extra-curricular eligibility, please contact Mr. Matt Hensley, Activities Director, 586-4962.

Transfer students and international exchange students should meet with the Activities Director, Mr. Matt Hensley, when enrolling at Mahomet-Seymour High School. There needs to be IHSA approval before a student/athlete becomes eligible for a sport.


TESTING

PSAT 9 (Fall of Grade 9)

PSAT 10 (Spring of Grade 10)

PSAT/NMSQT (October)

  • Optional test for Juniors
  • Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMS

  • AP Exams are given during the morning or afternoon on school days in May. Classroom teachers and counselors will notify students of the exact dates and times. These exams are optional, but students could earn college credit based on scores, college and major.
  • AP Exams are given in the following subject areas:
    • AP English Literature
    • AP French Language & Culture
    • AP U.S. History
    • AP Micro-Economics
    • AP Macro-Economics
    • AP Calculus BC
    • AP Spanish Language & Culture
    • AP Physics C (Mechanics)
    • AP Physics C (Electricity & Magnetism)
    • AP Chemistry
    • AP Biology

ACT TEST (CEEB)

  • High School Code: 142720
  • Students register at www.act.org to take the national ACT test.

SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST (SAT) (CEEB)


STATE UNIVERSITIES AT A GLANCE

FOUR-YEAR PLAN

REQUIRED COURSES

Freshman

  • English 1 (Regular or Honors)
  • Speech Communication (R9 or R10)
  • Mathematics
  • Biology
  • Civics (R9, 10, 11, or 12)
  • Health
  • P.E. (1 semester)

Sophomore

  • English 2 (Regular or Honors)
  • Speech Communication (R9 or R10)
  • Mathematics
  • Civics (R9, 10, 11, or 12)
  • P.E. (2 semesters)
  • Driver Education

Junior

  • English 3 (Regular or Honors)
  • U.S. History (Regular or AP)
  • Mathematics
  • Civics (R9, 10, 11, or 12)
  • Advisory SAT Prep
  • P.E. (2 semesters)

Senior

  • English (1 semester)
  • Civics (R9, 10, 11, or 12)
  • Consumer Education, Economics, Ag Business Operations
  • P.E. (2 semester)

COURSE SEQUENCES

H = Honors / R = Required

English

  • English 1 (R9) (Regular or Honors)
  • Speech Communication (R9 or R10)
  • Reading (9)
  • English 2 (R10) (Regular or Honors)
  • English 3 (R11) (Regular or Honors)
  • Modern Literature (12)
  • College Preperatory Writing (H) (12)
  • British Literature (H) (12)
  • AP English Literature & Composition (12)

Mathematics

  • Pre-Algebra (9)
  • Algebra 1A (9-10)
  • Algebra 1B (10-11)
  • Algebra 1 (9)
  • Geometry (Regular or Honors) (9-12)
  • Algebra 2 (Regular or Honors) (10-12)
  • Pre-Calculus (H) (11-12)
  • Statistics (H) (11-12)
  • Trigonometry (H) (11-12)
  • AP Calculus BC (12)

Science

  • Biology (R9)
  • Earth Science (10-12)
  • Food Chemistry 1 (10-12)
  • Food Chemistry 2 (10-12)
  • BSAA (10-12)
  • PSAA (10-12)
  • Chemistry 1 (10-12)
  • Anatomy & Physiology (11-12)
  • Chemistry 2 (H) (11-12)
  • Physics (11-12)
  • AP Biology (11-12)
  • AP Chemistry (11-12)
  • AP Physics (12)

Social Studies

  • Civics (R) (9-12)
  • World Geography (9-10)
  • Current History (10-12)
  • World History 1 (10-12)
  • World History 2 (10-12)
  • U.S. History (R11)
  • AP U.S. History (11)
  • Government & Law 2 (H) (10-12)
  • Sociology (H) (10-12)
  • Economics (H) (10-12)
  • AP Economics (10-12)

World Languages

  • French 1, 2, 3 (H), 4 (H) (9-12)
  • Spanish 1, 2, 3 (H), 4 (H) (9-12)
  • AP French or AP Spanish (12)

Family and Consumer Science

  • Child Development (9-12)
  • Adult Living (9-12)
  • Foods & Nutrition (10-12)
  • Hospitality & Culinary Arts (11-12)
  • Food Chemistry 1 (10-12)
  • Food Chemistry 2 (10-12)
  • FACS Skills (11-12)
  • Early Childhood Practicum (11-12)

Agriculture

  • Introduction to Agriculture (9-11)
  • Mechanization (10-12)
  • BSAA (10-12)
  • PSAA (10-12)
  • Power Mechanics (10-12)
  • Horticulture Science 1 (10-12)
  • Horticulture Science 2 (10-12)
  • Agribusiness Management (11-12)
  • Agribusiness Operations (11-12)

Technology

  • Introduction to Industrial Engineering (9-12)
  • Construction (10-12)
  • Manufacturing (11-12)
  • Drafting/Auto CAD (11-12)
  • 3D Animation (10-12)

Art

  • Basic Design (9-12)
  • Sculpture (9-12)
  • Drawing & Painting 1 (10-12)
  • Drawing & Painting 2 (11-12)
  • Sculpture 2 (11-12)
  • Graphic Design (11-12)

Drama

  • Drama 1 (9-12)
  • Drama 2 (9-12)

Music

  • Concert Band (9-12)
  • Band: Wind Ensemble (9-12)
  • Concert Choir (9-12)
  • Chamber Choir (9-12)
  • Treble Choir (girls not in band) (9-12)
  • Concert Band/Concert Choir (9-12)
  • Wind Ensemble/Chamber Choir (9-12)

Business

  • Orientation to Business (9-10)
  • Word Processing 1 (9-12)
  • Word Processing 2 (10-12)
  • Computer Applications (10-12)
  • Accounting (11-12)
  • Web Design 1 (11-12)
  • Web Design 2 (11-12)

Additional Courses

  • Health (R9)
  • Consumer Education (R11 or R12)
  • Medical Careers 1 (11-12)
  • Action Education (11-12)
  • ACT Prep Class (R11)
  • Yearbook 1, 2, 3 (10-12)
  • Digital Media 1, 2 (10-12)

Physical Education

  • P.E. (R9, R10, R11, R12)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGLISH

  • Freshmen must select English 1. The distinction between Regular and Honors will be determined using a matrix applied by HS faculty.
  • Sophomores must select English 2. The distinction between Regular and Honors will be determined using the following criteria.
    • English 2 (Regular): Completion of English 1 Regular
    • English 2 (Honors): “C” or better in English 1 (Honors) or matrix applied by HS faculty
  • Freshmen or sophomores must select Speech Communication.
  • Juniors must select English 3. The distinction between Regular and Honors will be determined using the following criteria.
    • English 3 (Regular): Completion of English 2 Regular
    • English 3 (Honors): “C” or better in English 2 (Honors) or matrix applied by HS faculty
    • In addition to English 3, students may elect to take EBC as a junior.
  • Seniors must select one semester of English. Possible course sequences (organized by emphasis) follow.

Possible Composition Sequences:

  • Junior year: English 3 (Regular)
  • Senior year: English / Business Communication or College Preparatory Writing (Honors)*
  • Junior year: English 3 (Honors)
  • Senior year: College Preparatory Writing (Honors) or AP English Literature and Composition

Possible Literature Sequences:

  • Junior year: English 3 (Regular)
  • Senior year: Modern Literature or British Literature (Honors)*
  • Junior year: English 3 (Honors)
  • Senior year: British Literature (Honors) or AP English Literature and Composition

* Requires meeting of prerequisites (See course description for details.)

ENGLISH 1 (Required: 9) - Credit: 1.0

English 1 places emphasis on practicing and improving academic reading and writing skills. The course includes units in reading of literature (poems, short stories, a novel, and a play) and informational text, writing paragraphs and short essays in a variety of styles, and grammar usage and mechanics. Students are also required to complete weekly independent reading practice. Homework is assigned on a regular basis. All essay final drafts must be word-processed.

ENGLISH 1 HONORS (Required: 9) - Credit 1.0

English 1 Honors is an accelerated version of regular English 1. It is intended for those with a demonstrated interest in the pursuit of advanced English studies. Students enrolled in this course should be proficient, independent readers. Literature studies focus on analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of literary elements. Grammar studies are rigorous; the units cover both usage and analysis of Standard English. Essays are assessed for content and for required grammar elements. There are also varied independent reading assignments throughout the year.

SPEECH COMMUNICATION (Required: 9 or 10) - Credit: 0.5

This course will cover units on verbal and nonverbal communication skills, listening, perception, persuasion and small group communication. Students will also prepare and present a variety of speeches. Students are expected to present all speeches assigned.

SUMMER SCHOOL SPEECH COMMUNICATION - Credit: 0.5

See Summer School offerings for more information.

READING (9) - Credit: 1.0

This is a closed class. Students are enrolled based on selection criteria. This class counts towards the English graduation requirement. Reading I focuses on learning and applying reading strategies to both fiction and nonfiction texts. Students will use a Web-based program and textbooks focused on reading strategies.

ENGLISH 2 (Required: 10) - Credit: 1.0

English 2 is a course in which emphasis is placed on reading comprehension skills (predicting, summarizing, connecting, questioning, inferring and imaging), analyzing text and the enhancement of communication skills. The course will include units in literature, writing, grammar, usage and mechanics, and vocabulary development. Essay assignments will include but are not limited to the following: persuasive, literary analysis, and a research paper. All essay drafts must be word processed.

ENGLISH 2 HONORS (Required: 10) - Credit 1.0
Prerequisite: “C” or better in English 1 (Honors) or matrix applied by HS faculty

English 2 Honors is a course with an emphasis on developing reading comprehension skills and analyzing texts according to advanced literary elements such as symbolism and irony. The enhancement of all communication skills are also emphasized (i.e. speaking, listening). The backbone of the course revolves around socratic seminar discussions in which students take a very active part in the guidance of their own learning. Students develop question-asking skills and critical thinking skills as well as a variety of discussion skills in order to create meaning in literature. The course focuses on world literature and includes short stories, grammar, novel, drama, essay writing, and research. All essay drafts must be word processed.

ENGLISH 3 (Required: 11) - Credit: 1.0

This course combines the study of composition skills and American literature. Major elements of this course include the development and refinement of writing skills and grammar. Essay assignments will include the following: critical/literary analysis, college application, narrative, expository, persuasive and a source-based paper. The course will also focus on the forms and themes of American literature and the historical activity that influenced the works from each period studied. Emphasis will be placed on the critical analysis of themes, literary styles, and techniques, as well as historical background and biographical information of selected American authors.

ENGLISH 3 HONORS (Required: 11) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: “C” or better in English 2 (Honors) or matrix applied by HS faculty

English 3 Honors is an accelerated version of regular English 3, and it is intended for students with an interest in college-level English studies. Three formal essays are assigned, and their rubrics are demanding. Grammar studies are rigorous; the units are covered at a faster pace and require analysis of Standard English. American Literary movements make up the literature taught in this course, beginning with Native American folklore through Modernism. Required reading includes selections from an anthology, one play, and one novel. There are also varied independent reading assignments throughout the year. This course is a prerequisite for British Literature or AP English.

ENGLISH & BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Completion of English 2

Units covered in class emphasize professional writing styles. Professional portfolio: resume and cover letter, job application and application essay, and interview questions and responses. Critical analysis of current workplace issues: MLA-formatted outline, essay, citation page, team newsletter and PowerPoint. Career exploration: source-based career exploration essay, citation page, phone script for cold call requests, thank you letter, report cover page, business memos, and charts/graphs. Students are strongly encouraged to engage in job shadows as part of the career exploration research project and required to give PowerPoint presentations about their research findings. Other workplace projects covered, as time allows, to better develop professional skills. Microsoft Word 2010 is used extensively in this computer lab-based course.

COLLEGE PREPARATORY WRITING Honors (12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Completion of English 3 (Honors) or a ‘B’ or higher in English 3 or consent of instructor

This course emphasizes the writing and critical thinking skills needed in a college/university setting. Students will learn the ways in which academic writing is achieved by joining a larger conversation with other analysts, researchers, and scholars and how to join that conversation. Assignments will include frequent short writing assignments and 2-3 longer papers with a focus on finding and integrating research, drafting, and revision. Students in this course will have the opportunity to write about topics in several fields--literature, biology, chemistry, physics, history, psychology, medicine, politics, and more.

MODERN LITERATURE (12) - Credit: 0.5

This course is concerned with the forms and themes of modern and contemporary literature, from 1900 – present day. Novels, short stories, and nonfiction books and articles will be used as reading material to encourage student engagement with literature. Emphasis will be on reading comprehension, academic and contextual vocabulary development, and written responses to particular works of literature and nonfiction pieces. In addition to regular text readings, students will be required to read modern or contemporary novels outside of class for literary analysis.

BRITISH LITERATURE Honors (12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Completion of English 3 (Honors) or a ‘B’ or higher in English 3 or consent of instructor

This course discusses forms and themes of and historical influences on British literature and authors, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon period. Short stories, poetry, excerpts from novels, nonfiction and drama are studied, with emphasis on critical analysis, academic and contextual vocabulary, themes and literary techniques. In addition to class text readings, students will be required to read a recognized classic novel from the British tradition outside of class for literary analysis project.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: English 3 Honors with grades of ‘B’ or both semesters or teacher recommendation

This course offers students the opportunity to experience a two-semester college level literature and composition course. The texts for the course will include novels, poetry, non fiction, criticism, and drama that range from the 16th century to the present day. The emphasis in writing will be on literary analysis. Grammar and vocabulary will be studied in the context of the reading and writing of the course. Students who enroll in this course should expect assignments such as reading up to 25-50 pages per night, timed writings in class, formal papers, research, journal writing, class discussions, online discussions, and class presentations. Students will be required to complete a summer reading and writing project.


MATHEMATICS

  • Students are placed in the freshman math course based on eighth grade math class, grades, test scores and teacher recommendation.
  • Students who are required to audit the first semester of a math class may raise their previous grade in that same class by earning a higher grade in the audited class.
  • College Admission/NCAA Requirements
    • To meet college admission and NCAA core course requirements, Algebra IA and Algebra IB together count as one year of Algebra I (one core course).
    • Algebra 1 taken in eighth grade does not meet NCAA core course requirements. Only courses taken during high school count toward NCAA core course requirements.
    • Algebra 1 taken in eighth grade does count for admission to colleges and universities.
    • Algebra 1A and 1B or Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 are required for admission to the public four-year universities in Illinois.
    • The NCAA requires at least three years of math (Algebra I or higher).
  • Calculators
    • Scientific Calculators: Required for ALL math courses.
    • Graphic Calculators: Required for all Honors courses. See instructor for recommended calculator for particular math classes.

PRE-ALGEBRA (9) - Credit: 1.0

An introductory course for students who are not yet ready to take beginning algebra. The skills and knowledge acquired in this course will prepare students for the algebra sequence. Topics included are properties of real numbers, using the four basic operations with positive and negative numbers, and solving one and two-step equations and inequalities.

ALGEBRA 1A (9-10) - Credit: 1.0

This course begins the study of high school algebra. Algebra 1A covers topics from the first semester of Algebra 1. Students who complete Algebra 1A and 1B will have completed a traditional Algebra 1 course. Topics include: operations with real numbers, solving linear equations and inequalities, and graphing solutions to equations and inequalities.

ALGEBRA 1B (10-11) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A

A continuation of Algebra 1A. Algebra 1B covers topics from the second semester of Algebra 1. The completion of this course indicates that students have completed a traditional Algebra 1 course. Topics include: factoring, writing equations, and solving equations containing radicals. Some geometrical concepts will also be studied.

ALGEBRA 1 (9) - Credit: 1.0

Reviews the properties of real numbers with major emphasis on solving linear equations. Topics included are: factoring, writing and graphing equations of lines, solving systems of equations and quadratic equations, and simplifying radicals. Designing equations to account for the unknown and manipulating/graphing linear inequalities will also be emphasized.

GEOMETRY (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1A / 1B

Two-column proofs are dealt with through the media of parallel lines, congruency of triangles, circles, and polygons. Both two-column proofs and paragraph-style proofs are used. Applications are used throughout the course. They include the Pythagorean Theorem, proportions in similar triangles, areas and volumes.
A review of algebra pervades the course.

GEOMETRY Honors (9-10) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 with a grade of ‘A’ both semesters or teacher recommendation

This course will cover all of the concepts of Geometry at an accelerated pace that will allow for the exploration of several additional topics, such as advanced graphing of quadratics and absolute values. Technology will be incorporated through the use of Geometers Sketchpad software. Students will also complete supplementary projects.

ALGEBRA 2 (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1A / 1B and Geometry

This course covers more complex algebraic topics including higher degree polynomials, matrices, sequences, series, imaginary numbers, combinations, permutations, and topics in trigonometry. The relationship between functions and their graphs is emphasized throughout the course.

ALGEBRA 2 Honors (10-11) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Geometry Honors or Geometry with a grade of ‘A’ and teacher recommendation

This class is a requirement for Pre-Calculus Honors. This course will cover all the concepts of Algebra 2 at an accelerated pace with additional curriculum including conic sections and applications of a graphics calculator.

PRE-CALCULUS Honors (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Honors with a recommended grade of ‘A’ or ‘B’

Topics studied include trigonometry, complex numbers, vectors, polynomials, logarithms, conic sections, polar coordinates, and matrices. Calculus concepts of limits, continuity, and first derivatives are introduced. Credit cannot be given for both Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus.

STATISTICS Honors (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with a grade of ‘A’ or ‘B’ or permission of instructor

A semester long course on data organization, measures of central tendency, variability, probability, and inferential statistics. This course covers most of the same material as a beginning level college statistics course. Class projects show how statistics can be applied to real life situations. This course pays special attention to college preparation.

TRIGONOMETRY Honors (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with a grade of ‘A’ or ‘B’ or permission of instructor

Credit cannot be given for both Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus. A semester long course introducing trigonometry through the use of the unit circle and right triangles. Other topics covered include trigonometric functions and their graphs. This course pays special attention to college preparation.

AP CALCULUS (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus with a recommended grade of ‘A’ or ‘B’

This course is the equivalent of two semesters of college calculus and prepares students for the AP Calculus BC test. Topics include: derivatives, applications of derivatives, integrals, applications of integrals, limits, approximation methods, techniques of integration, vector, parametric, polar functions, and Taylor series.


SCIENCE

* All science classes are lab sciences.

BIOLOGY (Required: 9) - Credit: 1.0

Biology I provides students with opportunities to develop an understanding of our living world. Biology is the study of living organisms and their structures, functions, vital processes, and interactions with each other and their environment. The interconnectedness of organisms and their environment will be discussed throughout this course. This course includes inquiry based labs, hands on activities, and projects as ways for students to apply what they have learned.

EARTH SCIENCE (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: One year of high school science

Earth Science is the study of the earth and the universe around it. The branches of earth science to be studied are: geology, oceanography, meteorology and astronomy. Topics included are: environment models of the earth, earthquakes, volcanoes, rocks and minerals, weathering and erosion, earth's past and fossils, oceans, atmosphere, weather, climate, stars, and galaxies.

FOOD CHEMISTRY 1 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra 1A

This course will introduce principles of chemistry through experimentation with food. The focus of the course is on laboratory experiments that relate science learning to everyday life. Metric measurement and scientific equipment are used to investigate the concepts of food and nutrition.

FOOD CHEMISTRY 2 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Food Chemistry 1

This class is a continuation and more in-depth study of the chemical makeup of food. The scientific method is used to study the biological and chemical basis for nutrition, preparation, preservation and processing of food. The hands-on experimental approach provides opportunities to apply science knowledge to daily living.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (BSAA) (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Biology

Interested in a career in vet or animal science? BSAA is hands-on lab based class that counts as a science credit for graduation. This course examines major phases of animal agriculture and the specific biological science concept as well as plant growth and management that govern management decisions in the animal industry. Sample topics include: chicken embryology, initiating and managing plant growth, growth and development of animals and processing animal products. Students can also establish a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and participate in agricultural science activities of the FFA. (offered odd years) (A208 & A218)

PHYSICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (PSAA) (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A

How does physical science affect your world? PSAA counts as a science credit for graduation and explores today and tomorrow’s sources for alternative energy. This course is hands on and lab based class that focuses on the following topics: Soil and Water Science, Agricultural Power Systems (energy, force, work, torque), and Environmental/Natural Resource Systems. Students can also establish a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and participate in agricultural science activities of the FFA. (offered even years) (A209 & A219)

CHEMISTRY 1 (9-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1. Freshman and sophomore students should have earned a ‘B’ or higher in Algebra 1 to be eligible for Chemistry 1. Freshmen will be required to take Biology concurrently with Chemistry 1.

This one-year course deals with the composition of matter, the changes matter undergoes, and the theories, laws and models that have been developed to explain these changes. This course is designed to prepare students for college chemistry.

CHEMISTRY 2 Honors (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1

This class is offered as a Parkland dual credit course taught at MSHS. To enroll in the dual credit option a student must have a minimum GPA: 4.0/5.0 and meet Parkland College’s reading assessment requirement. This one-semester course will mirror the Chemistry 106 for Health Professions at Parkland College. Students will be introduced to advanced topics in General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Biological Chemistry, with specific examples which apply to medicine. Laboratory and online work will augment in-class discussions.

AP CHEMISTRY (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 with an ‘A’ or ‘B’ and Algebra 2

This year-long course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. The course emphasizes chemical calculation and the mathematical formulation of chemical principles. The student will need to purchase a carbonless copy laboratory notebook so that a permanent record of the laboratories may be kept as proof to colleges of experiments completed. Topics covered will include: stoichiometry, reactions in solution, oxidation reduction, properties of gases, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, shapes of molecules, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. In order to cover the material recommended by the College Board, students will be required to complete a summer assignment.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry 1

A study of physiology and anatomy, including various systems of the body, anatomical directions, anatomical planes, and body cavities. There is some comparative anatomy between members of different vertebrate classes using skeletons and skulls of Illinois animals, and between human and cat. This course includes biochemistry, cytology, and histology, as well as dissection of a cat.

AP BIOLOGY (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry 1. Sophomores in AP Bio should have earned an 'A' or 'B' in both Biology and Chemistry as a freshman.

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course. The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for contemporary biology and to appreciate science as a process. The four main areas of content are: molecules and cells, heredity, evolution, and organisms and populations. Written explanations of concepts in these areas through essays, formal lab reports and experimental designs are emphasized. Completion of a summer assignment is required.

PHYSICS Dual Credit (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Students must meet Parkland math prerequisites (at least Algebra 2 and passing placement exam requirements) and also complete a dual credit application process.

Topics covered include: kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, heat, fluids, wave motion, and sound (semester 1) as well as electricity, magnetism, optics, relativity, and atomic structure (semester 2).  Upon successful completion of the class students will receive credit at Parkland for PHY 121 and PHY 122. For the purposes of GPA calculation, this course is given weight equal to that of an AP course. Credit cannot be given for both Physics Dual Credit and AP Physics C.

AP PHYSICS C (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a calculus based, college level physics course. Major topics include: mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work, energy, momentum, circular motion, rotations, oscillations and gravitation) and electricity and magnetism (electrostatics, capacitors, circuits, and electromagnetism). The course will utilize guided inquiry and student-centered learning to foster development of critical thinking skills and uses differential and integral calculus throughout the course. This course will prepare students to take the AP Physics C exam given by the College Board in May each school year. Credit cannot be given for both Physics Dual Credit and AP Physics C.


SOCIAL STUDIES

CIVICS (Required: 9-12) - Credit: 0.5
This course is required of all students graduating in 2020 and beyond.

Civics is a required course for graduation and covers several aspects of government. Civics will explore the origins of the American democratic system while looking at how the constitution embodies the values and purposes set up by the founding fathers. The structure and function of the government will be analyzed on a national, state, and local level while showing how each level is interrelated. This will launch the class into discussing how constitutional values relate to other nations and world affairs. Throughout the course we will focus on how the people play an active role in government and the importance each citizen contributes to society.

WORLD GEOGRAPHY (9-10) - Credit: 0.5

The course is an analysis of the existing and emerging geographic and cultural patterns in the world. It will focus on political and physical geography as well as interrelationships of each particular culture with environment, resources and social systems. The course will acquaint students with the practical use of maps and Geographic Information Systems. It will also consider how cultures work and make sense, how cultures adapt and change through time, and how culture is expressed. Emphasis will be placed on Eurasia, Africa, Asia, and Australia/Oceania.

SUMMER SCHOOL WORLD GEOGRAPHY (9-10) - Credit: 0.5

See Summer School offerings for more information.

CURRENT HISTORY (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

Students will develop a greater understanding of the world in which they live through discovery, summary, and analysis of current topics of social studies. They will learn to view media in a logical fashion and develop their critical thinking skills. The class will engage in discussion about various topics, use current issues and articles to examine and expand their personal beliefs, and increase their acceptance of diverse opinions.

WORLD HISTORY 1 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

A survey of human history through a multitude of cultures from the Fertile Crescent through the Western Renaissance. An analysis of man’s political, economic, social, and intellectual development through the centuries will provide a foundation for a critical understanding and appreciation of the inherent values of both Western and Eastern civilizations. (Offered every two years) - Not available in 2019-2020

WORLD HISTORY 2 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

Explores the transformation to the modern geo-political world. Tracing events from the 17th century through the modern era, students will explore the history and background of the complexity of issues involved in our current unfolding world situation. Students may take this class without taking World History 1. (Offered every two years) - Available in 2019-2020

UNITED STATES HISTORY (Required: 11) - Credit: 1.0

A survey of United States History from Late Medieval Europe and Pre Columbian America to the present including the origins, development, society, and institutions of the United States. A U.S. Constitution exam and an Illinois Constitution exam are administered in U.S. History. By state law, students must pass both constitution exams in addition to passing the course itself in order to graduate.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (11) - Credit: 1.0

Advanced Placement U.S. History offers students the opportunity to experience a two semester college-level survey course covering American history from pre-discovery times to the present. Students who enroll in this class should expect a strong emphasis to be placed on reading and writing skills. Assignments will include regular text reading, supplemental reading, essay writing, and a research paper. In order to cover the material recommended by the College Board, students will be required to complete a summer reading and writing assignment.

GOVERNMENT & LAW 2 Honors (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

A law course for advanced students. The course material will concentrate on constitutional law, juvenile rights, family law, the police, school law, and tort and liability laws. Legal research and writing will also be emphasized.

ECCA CRIMINAL JUSTICE (11-12) - Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: 2.5/4.0 GPA

This program provides a history of the development, philosophy, and constitutional aspects of criminal justice procedures and agencies. Included will be an overview of the juvenile delinquency system and the United States correctional system. Other topics will be criteria for criminal acts, requisite mental state, criminal parties, causation and defenses, common law crimes, and application of the Illinois Criminal Code. This course is taught at Parkland College.

SOCIOLOGY Honors (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the concepts, theories, vocabulary and perspectives presented in an introductory sociology class. Included are such topics as: culture, social structure, social interaction, socialization, social stratification, and marriage and family. Students are required to write a paper and prepare an oral presentation based upon their individual research of an approved topic. The course is designed for the college-bound student and is open to seniors as an elective.

ECONOMICS Honors (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to expose students to the basic microeconomic and macroeconomic theories relating to the free market system. Students will run their own business for a week and also complete a project related to the stock market. Economics is designed especially for the college-bound student who will be required to complete similar courses in the future. Economics meets the Consumer Education requirement for graduation.

AP ECONOMICS (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Sophomores taking AP Econ should have A’s or B’s in previous courses and general awareness/interest in political economy or instructor recommendation

Advanced Placement Economics is designed to be the equivalent of two semesters of college economics. The course covers both micro and macroeconomic concepts and will prepare students to take the corresponding AP exams. As in such college courses, the material is frequently theoretical and abstract. Students who enroll should expect an emphasis on reading and writing at advanced levels as well as on employing these skills to analyze the current political/economic situation of the U.S. In order to cover the material recommended by the College Board, students will also be required to complete a summer reading and writing assignment. This course meets the Consumer Education requirement for graduation.


WORLD LANGUAGES

  • Mahomet-Seymour World Languages offers students the opportunity to achieve the Illinois Seal of Biliteracy. For more information, CLICK HERE.
  • To continue in French/Spanish, a recommended grade of ‘C-‘ or higher should be earned in the previous course. Consent of the teacher will be required for any student not earning a C- or higher.
  • Colleges that require two years of world language for admission require two years of the same language.
  • University of Illinois World Language Admission Requirements:
    • The University of Illinois requires two years of the same world language for admission.
  • University of Illinois World Language Graduation Requirements:
    • Minimum third level language required of all programs (three years of the same language in high school or three semesters of the same language at the university level).
    • Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Commerce and Business Administration require four years of the same language in high school or four semesters of the same language at the college level.
    • Recommendation: complete four years in high school
  • View the current State University Foreign Language Requirements

FRENCH 1, 2, 3, 4 / SPANISH 1, 2, 3, 4 (9-12) - Credit: 1.0

The study of French and Spanish emphasizes and encourages students to express themselves in a second language. Readiness to listen to and participate in the target language is essential. Second language studies focus on communicative skills and critical thinking. The activities (cultural concepts, geography, language structure, vocabulary, history and literature) provide the framework for the acquisition of skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and promote cultural awareness and global understanding.

The advanced study of world languages (3/4) (Honors) incorporates a variety of activities including cultural concepts, geography, language structure, history, literature and art. Level 3 focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar concepts, reading comprehension and writing skills. Level 4 focuses on literature, culture, and strengthening reading, writing and speaking skills.

AP FRENCH LANGUAGE / AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (LEVEL 5) - Credit: 1.0

The AP courses are designed to promote language proficiency and to enable the student to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course:

  • Focuses on communication through the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication.
  • Encourages cultural awareness by studying and discussing the products, practices and perspectives of the target cultures.
  • Incorporates the following themes: global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities, beauty and aesthetics.
  • Students will be required to complete summer work in the target language.

MSHS offers the following CTE courses to all students: Agricultural Education; Business, Marketing and Computer Education; Family and Consumer Sciences; Health Sciences Occupations; Industrial Occupations. 

BUSINESS

ORIENTATION TO BUSINESS (9-10) - Credit: 0.5

This course provides an introduction to the United States economics system and the economic role of business. It also provides information concerning career choice, money management, the use of banking services for business, and the stock market. The course includes an investigation of how our free enterprise system functions showing characteristics of the enterprise economy. (B101)

WORD PROCESSING 1 (9-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Proficient keyboarding skills

Learn Microsoft Word 2010. Can you answer all of the following questions: What is a continuous break? How do I set right tabs with leaders? Or center tabs? Or decimal tabs? How do I merge cells in a table? What is the difference between a left column and a right column? How do I add a drop cap and a text box? How do I add formatting to change only one section of a document? How do I add page numbers in a header? How do I insert clipart and make the text wrap around it? Or write over the top of it? If your answer is no, then Word Processing 1 is the course for you. The features of MS Word are almost endless. Don’t slow yourself down academically by not knowing the fastest, most efficient ways to use MS Word. These are only a few of the topics covered in this one semester course. (B215)

WORD PROCESSING 2 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Word Processing 1

Use Microsoft Word 2010. Learn the features that really make MS Word work for you. Learn to merge multiple addresses into one document for multiple, personalized letters or mailing labels. Create brochures and flyers. Create online forms like those used on websites. Find out the easy way to create a table of contents or an index. Quickly sort any list of names or numbers alphabetically; filter out only the ones you need. See how to make the computer do the math for you when calculating formulas. Create tables that look like professionals made them. Save steps by creating macros. (B215)

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Word Processing 1 or approval of the instructor.

This class is a prerequisite for the Introduction to Information Technology classes at Parkland. This course is an application of the Microsoft Office package. Microsoft Office is quickly becoming one of the most widely used software packages in both the private and public sectors. The course includes Microsoft Office 2010:

  • MICROSOFT WORD - a word processing package
  • ACCESS - a database program
  • EXCEL - spreadsheet application
  • POWERPOINT - an impressive presentation package
  • PUBLISHER – create signs, flyers, brochures and more (B216)

ACCOUNTING (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Recommended Algebra 1 with a ‘C’ or higher

This course is a “must have” if you are considering a business major in college. Learn the language of all businesses – accounting. Managers must “know the numbers” to make any decision. Learn how to properly record and maintain all money within a business. Understand the basics of debits, credits, accounts, and ledgers. Examine the operations of a service business, a merchandising business, and a corporation. Create balance sheets, income statements, capital statements, and statements of stockholder’s equity. Buy and sell inventory, journalize receivables and payables, and depreciate equipment. Computer simulation is completed second semester. (B201)

WEB DESIGN 1 (11-12) - Credit: 0.5

Students will plan, design, create and maintain web pages and sites using Dreamweaver CS3 and XHTML. Students will work in a project-based environment to create a working website. Instruction will include creating pages, adding hyperlinks, creating forms, integrating images and setting styles. Students will use image-editing programs to manipulate scanned images, computer graphics and original artwork. (B218)

WEB DESIGN 2 (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Web Design 1 with a recommended grade of ‘C’ or higher

Students will use multimedia authoring applications (Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks) and programming tools such as Javascript to create a website that combines text, hyperlinks, images, video and sound. Instruction will include tables, columns, side menus and call-outs. Students will learn how to use templates, cascading style sheets, and interactive elements to enhance web pages. Students will also learn to create dynamic forms that include multiple-choice questions, comment boxes and buttons. (B219)


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE (FACS)

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course will help the student understand and guide younger children more effectively. Prenatal development, birth, infant care, and the social, physical and emotional development of children are studied. (H105)

ADULT LIVING (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

Focuses on preparing students for multiple life decisions. Students will learn the responsibilities that are associated with the need of being independent and understanding the philosophy of life. Students will focus on developing their own self-concepts, morals and values. This class will increase the students’ ability to communicate with problem solving and decision making skills. A strong emphasis is put on the relationships that are built through family, friends, significant others, and work.

FOODS & NUTRITION (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to provide students with the skills to select, prepare, and serve nutritious snacks and meals in an appetizing way. Laboratory situations stress that skills in food preparation and proper nutrition are a means to better health and energy. (H103)

HOSPITALITY & CULINARY ARTS (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Foods & Nutrition or permission of the instructor

This course introduces students to the world of professional cooking. Students will explore careers and develop the skills needed for success in the food service industry. A strong emphasis will be placed on the study of food, sanitation, marketing, and methods of preparation in relation to food service. (H220)

EARLY CHILDHOOD PRACTICUM (11-12) - Credit: 1.0

This 2nd semester course meets daily for two consecutive class periods to provide for in depth work in child development. During the playgroup setting, the student will serve as a student/lead teacher under the supervision of the classroom instructor. The class is designed to give the student an opportunity to plan lessons, set up a childcare facility, and learn more about the ways in which preschool children learn. Students who meet all requirements will obtain a Level 1 ECE Certification from the state of Illinois. (H210)

FACS SKILLS (11-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to introduce students to skills necessary for life after high school or college. The course includes laboratory experiences in the following content areas: food preparation and meal planning; textiles and sewing; career and life management skills; parenting and family; housing preparation, search, and management.

FOOD CHEMISTRY 1 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra 1A

This course will introduce principles of chemistry through experimentation with food. The focus of the course is on laboratory experiments that relate science learning to everyday life. Metric measurement and scientific equipment are used to investigate the concepts of food and nutrition. (H106)

FOOD CHEMISTRY 2 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Food Chemistry 1

This class is a continuation and more in-depth study of the chemical makeup of food. The scientific method is used to study the biological and chemical basis for nutrition, preparation, preservation and processing of food. The hands-on experimental approach provides opportunities to apply science knowledge to daily living. (H106)


AGRICULTURE

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE (9-11) - Credit: 1.0

From eating steak to gaining leaderships skills, this introductory course provides students with opportunities to discover the diverse range of topics within the agriculture industry. Students gain skills to become leaders of tomorrow and insight on scholarships available in the National FFA Organization. Topic areas include studying animal science, plant science, horticulture, agricultural mechanization, food science, and environmental resources. (A101)

AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to develop student knowledge and skills in the areas of leadership techniques, intrapersonal communications, and goal-setting processes. The class will be hands-on and activity-based. Student skills will be enhanced in reading comprehension, writing, and communication practices by exploring a variety of leadership styles and models. The class will develop and establish a student’s Personal Leadership Portfolio at the conclusion of the course. This portfolio has the potential to qualify for a University of Illinois Leadership Certificate.

AGRISCIENCE (10-11) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Agriculture

This course is designed to give students further knowledge in the areas of biotechnology, animal science, and plant science. Applied math and science skills are stressed throughout the course. Areas of instruction include nutritional needs, growth sequence, reproduction, and propagation. Soil science includes formation of soil structure, analysis of soil components, and evaluation of soil conservation. FFA and Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAE) are integral components of this course. Students are encouraged to maintain SAE’s and to participate in activities of the FFA organization. (A102)

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Agriculture

Interested in earning a scholarship for going to class? Enrollment in this course provides students with a scholarship by serving as a student manager of the Mahomet-Seymour Ag Supply Store and Greenhouse. While learning about concepts of agricultural business with first-hand management work experience, students earn consumer education credit for graduation. Students taking this course may be interested in establishing their own agribusiness in credit and loans, hotel and restaurant management, insurance, and agricultural equipment sales and products. (offered even years) (A201)

AGRIBUSINESS OPERATIONS (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Agriculture

This second year level course is designed to develop student knowledge and skills in operating an agribusiness. Instructional units include: establishing, managing, and financing the agribusiness; marketing and advertising, product development, sales techniques and strategies, and communicating with employees and customers. Student’s skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. The class will set up and run a cooperative business. This course meets the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. This class manages and operates the MSHS supply store and greenhouse. (offered odd years) (A202)

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (BSAA) (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Biology

Interested in a career in vet or animal science? BSAA is hands-on lab based class that counts as a science credit for graduation. This course examines major phases of animal agriculture and the specific biological science concept as well as plant growth and management that govern management decisions in the animal industry. Sample topics include: chicken embryology, initiating and managing plant growth, growth and development of animals and processing animal products. Students can also establish a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and participate in agricultural science activities of the FFA. (offered odd years) (A208 & A218)

PHYSICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (PSAA) (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A

How does physical science affect your world? PSAA counts as a science credit for graduation and explores today and tomorrow’s sources for alternative energy. This course is hands on and lab based class that focuses on the following topics: Soil and Water Science, Agricultural Power Systems (energy, force, work, torque), and Environmental/Natural Resource Systems. Students can also establish a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and participate in agricultural science activities of the FFA. (offered even years) (A209 & A219)


AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION

  • Students interested in auto mechanics should follow this sequence.

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE (9-11) - Credit: 1.0

From eating steak to gaining leaderships skills, this introductory course provides students with opportunities to discover the diverse range of topics within the agriculture industry. Students gain skills to become leaders of tomorrow and insight on scholarships available in the National FFA Organization. Topic areas include studying animal science, plant science, horticulture, agricultural mechanization, food science, and environmental resources. (A101)

AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course is designed to develop student knowledge and skills in the areas of leadership techniques, intrapersonal communications, and goal-setting processes. The class will be hands-on and activity-based. Student skills will be enhanced in reading comprehension, writing, and communication practices by exploring a variety of leadership styles and models. The class will develop and establish a student’s Personal Leadership Portfolio at the conclusion of the course. This portfolio has the potential to qualify for a University of Illinois Leadership Certificate.
(NOTE: This is a proposed course for 2018-19 currently pending board approval)

MECHANIZATION (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Agriculture

Classroom learning and hands-on experiences provide opportunities for students to develop basic knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics. Instructional areas include the basic fundamentals of surveying and global positioning systems (GPS), maintaining and repairing small gasoline engines, basic electricity, welding, cold metal work, and operating agricultural equipment safely. Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus. (A205)

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (BSAA) (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Biology

Interested in a career in vet or animal science? BSAA is hands-on lab based class that counts as a science credit for graduation. This course examines major phases of animal agriculture and the specific biological science concept as well as plant growth and management that govern management decisions in the animal industry. Sample topics include: chicken embryology, initiating and managing plant growth, growth and development of animals and processing animal products. Students can also establish a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and participate in agricultural science activities of the FFA. (offered odd years) (A208 & A218)

PHYSICAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE (PSAA) (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A

How does physical science affect your world? PSAA counts as a science credit for graduation and explores today and tomorrow’s sources for alternative energy. This course is hands on and lab based class that focuses on the following topics: Soil and Water Science, Agricultural Power Systems (energy, force, work, torque), and Environmental/Natural Resource Systems. Students can also establish a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and participate in agricultural science activities of the FFA. (offered even years) (A209 & A219)

POWER MECHANICS (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Mechanization with a minimum grade of ‘C’

This comprehensive machinery service course concentrates on the following areas: fundamentals of multi-cylinder engines, reconditioning and repair of equipment, adjustment and maintenance of equipment, using service manuals, and electrical applications for equipment. Diesel power concepts will also be explored. (A206A)

ECCA AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY - YEAR ONE (11-12) - Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial Engineering or Introduction to Agriculture; 2.0/4.0 GPA

This program introduces students to the skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks with internal combustion engines. Instructional units include: Automotive industry overview, careers, advanced training options, and workplace ethics; Vehicle safety, operation, inspection and maintenance; Hybrid vehicle operation and safety; Vehicle steering and suspension system operation, component inspection and repair, braking system operation, inspection and repair. Upon ICCB approval, students who successfully complete both years of the automotive program will have completed the coursework necessary for the Parkland College Maintenance and Light Repair Certificate. This course is taught at Parkland College.

ECCA AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY - YEAR TWO (12) - Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: ECCA Automotive Technology - Year One; 3.0/5.0 GPA

This program introduces students to the skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks with internal combustion engines. Instructional units include: Engine operation, testing and performance. Automotive electrical/electronic system operation, inspection, testing and repair. Cooling system inspection, testing and maintenance; Drive axle inspection and service. Second year students will have the opportunity to earn ASE student certifications. Upon ICCB approval, students who successfully complete both years of the automotive program will have completed the coursework necessary for the Parkland College Maintenance and Light Repair Certificate. This course is taught at Parkland College.


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE

  • Introduction to Agriculture and Agriscience are recommended prerequisites but not required
  • Students can apply for dual credit through Parkland College by taking both semesters of Horticulture in the same year. Minimum GPA: 4.0

HORTICULTURE SCIENCE 1 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5

This course focuses on the landscape, nursery and turf segments of the horticulture industry. Units of study include: basics of plant growth, identifying horticultural plants, designing landscape plans, hardscape construction techniques, and installing landscape plants. Agribusiness units will cover calculating prices for work, managing a horticulture business, advertising and sales. (A207)

HORTICULTURE SCIENCE 2 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Horticultural Science 1

This advanced course is designed to develop knowledge and skills in the following areas: using soil and other plant growing media, identifying horticultural plants, propagating horticultural plants; basics of growing plants in the greenhouse; principles of floral design (centerpieces, corsages and holiday designs); operating, repairing and maintaining equipment used in the horticultural field. (A207)



TECHNOLOGY

The Industrial Technology Department has secured a grant to purchase a CNC machine called a Shopbot. Students enrolled in Intro to Tech, Drafting, Construction, and Manufacturing will utilize this machine throughout the course. Those interested in engineering design concepts will have the opportunity to use cutting edge technology to create and make various projects. Also, activities focusing on the collaboration of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math will be highlighted.

INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (9-12) - Credit: 1.0
(Formerly Introduction to Technology)

This course is designed as an exploratory study in a wide range of technology-related areas. Students will be highly engaged in hands-on, minds-on learning through various problem-solving activities and design challenges. Projects may include: mousetrap powered vehicles, trebuchet catapults, small scale manufacturing/production, multimedia design and image/print transfer processes, rocketry, and Rube Goldberg machines. Through each project, students study STEM concepts (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), and follow a design process that emphasizes critical thinking and creativity. (I104 & I105)

CONSTRUCTION (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial Engineering or permission of instructor

This course is designed to expose the student to the processes, materials, and procedures related to the construction and manufacturing. Students will have the opportunity to build various projects and aid in the construction processes involved with building a yard shed. Throughout the course students will learn how to use hand and power tools. The student will learn measurement skills, related math skills, safety, and proper work habits. Construction units include concrete, framing techniques, and finishing techniques. Each unit will involve related shop experiences throughout the school year. Lab fees are charged for individual projects. This course is now available as dual credit through Parkland College, you can earn college credit while taking a class at the high school. (I210)

MANUFACTURING 1 (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Construction

This course focuses on furniture design and construction, along with safety and proper use of power tools. Students will gain large experience in the world of CNC machining and have the ability to utilize 3D printing. Students will utilize the department CNC Machines and design software. Students complete a major woodworking project of their choice. Lab fees are charged for individual projects. (I240A)

MANUFACTURING 2 (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Construction or permission of instructor

This application course will provide background knowledge and experience in manufacturing through entrepreneurship. Students will form a small business. Instructional units include research and development, design, company organization, financing, cost estimating, cost analysis, advertising and marketing. (I241A)

DIGITAL MULTI-MEDIA CLASS 1, 2 (10-12) - Credit: 1.0

This course introduces students to the world of digital media. Students will become proficient in video post production using industry-grade software, including: Adobe Premiere, Adobe AfterEffects and Adobe Photoshop. Various projects may include digital storytelling, highlight videos for varsity sports, DVD authoring, video announcements, school-related video creation, instructional video creation, and video yearbook. Students will run and produce Bulldog TV including broadcast of all home varsity sporting events and taking on the positions of announcer, A/V engineer, and camera operator. [Second year students will be required to assume a position of leadership and a supervisory role on projects.]

ECCA MANUFACTURING - YEAR ONE (11-12) - Credit 2.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial Engineering or Introduction to Agriculture; 2.0/4.0 GPA

The manufacturing program is located in the state-of-the-art Parkhill Applied Technology Center at Parkland College. Instruction will include general machining procedures including operations of the drill press, lathe, and mill. Bench work operations including layout and hand tools and basic machine tool projects using cross section of machine tool equipment will be covered. Architectural, mechanical, and electrical applications of AutoCAD software will be included in the program. Materials used by design engineers including ferrous metals, nonferrous metals, and plastics will be discussed. Included will be an introduction to computer numeric control (CNC) and CNC programming, with an emphasis placed on the fundamentals of CNC lathe and mill operations.

ECCA MANUFACTURING - YEAR TWO (12) - Credit 2.0
Prerequisite: ECCA Manufacturing - Year One; 2.0/4.0 GPA

This program will include interpreting documentation for assembly and installation requirements; fundamentals of power transmission; basic and precision measuring tools; fasteners, tools, and torque specifications; bearing types and applications; seals; gaskets, and lubrication. It will also include introduction to theory and applications of fluid and pneumatic power transfer and control. Content will include the design process with practical and computer-aided evaluation of power transmission devices, including gears, shafts, belts, chains, and other components using SolidWorks software.

TECHNICAL/ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial Engineering or permission of instructor

This course is designed to provide a student with information and practical experience needed for the development of job related competencies for a career in drafting, construction, engineering or architecture. Engineering topics include multi-view drawing and dimensioning, three-dimensional design and pictorial drawing, and product assembly plans. The architectural segment will emphasize floor plans, elevations, wall sections, and plot detail. Students will use both hand drafting tools and industry-grade CAD programs to complete projects. Students will also have the opportunity to design products for Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) manufacturing and 3D printing. (I230)

3D ANIMATION (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial Engineering or permission of the instructor

Students will learn 3D animation and modeling techniques using 2015 3D Studio Max software. This course focuses on scene, shape, and object creation and manipulation. Attention will also be given to rendering and animating tutorials and student driven ideas. Students will have exposure to 3D printing design and creation. (I234)

ECCA COMPUTER NETWORKING - YEAR ONE (11-12) - Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: 2.5/4.0 GPA

This program will cover an introduction to microcomputer operating systems. Topics will include everyday care and maintenance of your PC, introduction to computer operation and software use, networking fundamentals, programming, and logic. Also included will be an introduction to local area networks, wide area networks, and the Internet. Program objectives will prepare the student to sit for the CompTIA Network+ and CompTIA A+ Essentials Certification Exams. Upon successful completion of a two-year Academy program, student will have earned two certificates (Microsoft Administration, Computer Foundations) at Parkland College. This course is taught at Parkland College.

ECCA COMPUTER NETWORKING - YEAR TWO (11-12) - Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: ECCA Computer Networking - Year One; 2.5/4.0 GPA

Topics will include a comprehensive study of Linux user commands and utilities. Also included will be the management of a Windows workstation including networking, operating system, installation, file system, profiles and policies, security, protocols, internetworking, remote access, printing, and troubleshooting. Other topics will include how to configure, customize, and troubleshoot Microsoft Network Operating Systems in a single-domain environment. Upon successful completion of a two-year Academy program, students will have earned two certificates (Microsoft Administration, Computer Foundations) at Parkland College. Second-year students will have completed the listed objectives for the Microsoft Windows Workstation Certification Exam and the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam. This course is taught at Parkland College.


FINE ARTS

ART

  • All art courses are semester courses.
  • Basic Design is the prerequisite for all other art courses.
  • A student may take the two dimensional track, the three dimensional track, the Applied Art track, or all three tracks.
  • Two Dimensional
    • Basic Design > Drawing & Painting 1 > Drawing & Painting 2
  • Three Dimensional
    • Basic Design > Sculpture 1 > Sculpture 2
  • Applied Art
    • Basic Design
    • Graphic Design

BASIC DESIGN (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

The student will learn basic drawing skills, and explore the basic elements of design. Sketchbook and textbook assignments will be given. This course is a prerequisite for all other art courses.

SCULPTURE 1 (FORMERLY CRAFTS) (9-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Basic Design

This course will focus on three-dimensional art. This couse consists of nine weeks of ceramics and nine weeks of printmaking as well as other sculpture types including wire, paper, and relief carving..

DRAWING AND PAINTING 1 (10-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Basic Design

The student will further develop the basic drawing skills, working in black and white and color media. Weekly sketchbook homework assignments are required. The history of art from Prehistoric through the Renaissance will be studied. Composition will be emphasized as students work in watercolor and paint on canvas with acrylics and oils.

DRAWING AND PAINTING 2 (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting 1

Students will work on more complex drawing and painting assignments dealing with content as well as composition and technique. The history of art from Northern Renaissance to the present will be studied. This course is for the self directed student who works well on his own. Weekly sketchbook homework assignments are required.

SCULPTURE 2 (FORMERLY JEWELRY) (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Sculpture 1

Sculpture 2 is a continuation and expansion of Sculpture 1 with the first 9 weeks focusing on ceramic techniques including hand-building, coiling, slab construction, glazing, and underglazing.    The other 9 weeks will be an introduction to metalworking with processes and techniques such as sawing, piercing, filing, sanding, and riveting sheet metal to create their projects.

GRAPHIC DESIGN (11-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Basic Design

Students will apply the elements and principles of design, along with the graphic elements of layout and type, to projects such as: the design of logos, letterheads, CD and book covers, packaging, advertisements, and posters. Students will use Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Traditional art media and computers will be used to create images. Both college bound and non-college bound students will learn useful computer skills.


BAND

Based on an audition held in the second semester of the previous school year, students involved in MSHS bands are placed in either Concert Band, Symphonic Band, or Wind Ensemble. Students are placed by ability level based upon a set standard of selected music and sight-reading material.

A student who is placed in Concert Band, Symphonic Band, or Wind Ensemble will be a part of Marching Band. The band participates in four marching competitions each fall and presents two or three concerts during the year. Marching Band runs through the end of October at which point students switch to the Concert Band setting. All after school rehearsals end at the conclusion of Marching Band. All Bands may also perform at Organization Contest and/or other festivals. The students in Concert Band, Symphonic Band, and Wind Ensemble must attend marching band camp the first week in August.

District and All-State Festival, University Honors Band, Solo and Ensemble Contest, Bulldog Brass and Jazz Band are additional outreach activities of the Band Department.

CHOIR

The Choral Department includes Chamber Choir, Concert Choir, Treble Choir, and several extra-curricular musical groups. All choirs study a variety of styles of music reflecting music from all periods of music history as well as music highlighting American composers.

Madrigals, District and All-State Festival, College Vocal Festivals, Solo and Ensemble Contest, Men’s Chorus and the Spring Musical are additional outreaches of the Choral Department, as well as periodic tours and special events.

Students must audition for placement in the advanced Chamber Choir.

CONCERT CHOIR (9-12) - Credit: 1.0

Concert Choir is a mixed ensemble with a major focus on vocal development and increasing maturity and control. Literature will include music of many styles and genres in three-to-six-part voicings. The group will perform in three concerts each year.

TREBLE CHOIR (9-12) - Credit: 1.0

Treble Choir is a women’s ensemble focusing on vocal production and the specific development of the head voice through the use of art songs as well as two-to-three-part music. The choir will perform in three concerts each year. (Incoming freshman and sophomore girls who are not in band will be placed in Treble Choir.)

CHAMBER CHOIR (10-12) - Credit: 1.0

Chamber Choir is an advanced mixed ensemble focusing on mature a cappella singing and challenging literature of all styles in four-to-eight-part voicings. This group performs three concerts each year, along with some special performance opportunities. (Audition required - demonstrating mature tone quality, advanced musicianship skills and sight-reading proficiency using solfege.)

CHAMBER CHOIR / WIND ENSEMBLE Honors (12) - Credit: 1.0

Students who are in Chamber Choir or Wind Ensemble will work independently on additional requirements, with assistance from the directors. Additional requirements include both performance pieces and research papers. Over the course of the year, musicians will move independently through Music Theory and Ear Training lessons from an internet-based site and will demonstrate proficiency through periodic written assessments.

DRAMA

DRAMA 1 (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

Basics of theatre and its terminology are introduced. Four areas analyzed on an introductory level are : script, stage, actor, and audience. Additional focuses within these areas include: auditioning, characterization in performance, and related tech fields (set design and construction, props, costume design and production, make-up, sound and lights, business and publicity). A short unit on Shakespeare and the Globe are also presented.

DRAMA 2 (9-12) - Credit: 0.5
Prerequisite: Drama 1 with a ‘B’ or better

This course continues from foundations in Drama I with an emphasis on performance in acting and directing. Use of pantomime, improv, oral interpretation, and duet acting will be included. More advanced work on the history of theatre will be presented. A final project in one of the main areas will be required.


OTHER COURSES

HEALTH (Required: 9) - Credit: 0.5

Health is a study of all areas of health: mental, physical, social, and emotional. The course emphasizes the importance of understanding oneself and others and accepting responsibility for one's own health. Topics include personal development, emotions, stress, nutrition, alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. The American Red Cross Standard First Aid and Personal Safety course (adult CPR and first aid) is included. Course completion cards may be issued. A human reproduction unit is presented. Any parents who do not want their children to attend classes dealing with reproduction must have a written note on file in the principal's office requesting an alternate project.

CONSUMER EDUCATION (Required: 11 or 12) - Credit: 0.5

This course or its equivalent is a graduation requirement for all students. This course helps one to understand the world of the consumer. Topics covered include: financial planning, insurance, consumer credit, budgeting, banking, advertising, taxes and career decision-making. (This class counts towards fulfilling the high school social studies requirement, but many colleges do not count it as a college prep social studies course.)

SAT PREP CLASS (Required: 11) - Credit: 0.25

This course meets four days per week during advisory period from the beginning of the year until late April, when the SAT test is provided by the State of Illinois. Students focus on lessons in math, reading and English. Additional instruction includes test-taking skills. Credit is given at the end of second semester for the class.

ACTION EDUCATION (12) - Credit: 0.25
Prerequisite: A history of good attendance

For the purposes of eligibility and student scheduling, Action Education is not considered an academic course. Action Education is a class designed for students who are considering a career in teaching. Students have the opportunity to work in an elementary or junior high school classroom on a daily basis. The student will work under the supervision of a classroom teacher and will perform the duties assigned by the classroom teacher. The student is responsible for transportation to other buildings. This class may be taken twice, but a student will receive credit only one time. Must be arranged with a cooperating teacher by April 1st of the previous school year.

MEDICAL CAREERS 1 (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: GPA: 2.5/4.0 or higher; Placement into ENG101, CCS099, MAT080/070

Fall Semester:
Students will learn the duties and educational requirements of health care providers as well as certain skills needed. Students will learn medical vocabulary, including learning to pronounce, spell, define, and analyze medical terms. This course is offered as a Dual Credit course with Parkland College, allowing students to earn both high school credit and a total of 5 hours of Parkland College credit for classes HCS112: Introduction to Health Careers (2 credit hours) and HCS 154: Medical Terminology (3 credit hours).

Spring Semester:
Students will be introduced to the professional and ethical standards required of all health care providers. Emphasis placed on accountability, interpersonal skills, communication, respect for self and others. Students will gain an understanding of law as it pertains to health professions with a focus on consent for medical services, invasion of privacy, malpractice, governmental regulations and actions for collection of patient bills. Students will also learn about current health topics both locally and globally. This course is offered as a Dual Credit course with Parkland College, allowing students to earn both high school credit and a total of 5 hours of Parkland College credit for classes HCS 136: Topics in Healthcare (4 credit hours) and HCS 174: Legal Issues in Healthcare (1 credit hour).

ECCA EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (12) - Credit: 2.0
Prerequisite: 2.5/4.0 GPA

Orientation to Health Occupations Course Description: The main purpose of this course is to assist students in further development of their self-concept and in matching personal abilities and interest to a tentative career choice within the healthcare field. Course content will provide in-depth information regarding health occupations careers and trends, the occupational and educational opportunities and the educational, physical, emotional and attitudinal requirements of careers in the medical field. Medical Terminology Course Description: The primary focus will be on developing both oral and written skills in the language used to communicate within health care professions. Legal Issues in Healthcare Course Description: This course focuses on law as it pertains to health professionals; consent for medical services, invasion of privacy, malpractice, governmental regulations, actions for collecting patient bills, bioethical, and end of life issues. This course is taught at Parkland College.

2nd Semester
Emergency Medical Technician Course Description: The Emergency Medical Services-Basic course prepares the student to provide pre-hospital assessment and care for patients of all ages with a variety of medical conditions and traumatic injuries. Areas of study include an introduction to emergency medical services systems, roles and responsibilities of EMT-Basics, anatomy and physiology, medical emergencies, trauma, special considerations for working in the pre-hospital setting, and providing patient transport. This course prepares the student to take the State of Illinois EMT-Basic license examination. This course is taught at Parkland College.

YAP ADVISORY (10, 12) - Credit: 0.0
Replace your free advisory period to become a Bulldog Buddy in the Young Adult Program! Do crafts, science experiments, play games, sing songs (and the occasional early-out field trip) with a small group of students. You may also have the chance to lead the activities for great leadership experience! Come be a Bulldog Buddy!

JOURNALISM

YEARBOOK 1, 2, 3 (10-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Grade of ‘B’ or higher in English classes, application with two faculty recommendations

Students produce the school yearbook, Retro, while gaining a broad understanding of journalism and the publishing process. Students will be taught the various aspects of reporting, journalistic writing, editing, graphic design/page layout and photography. Seniors in Yearbook may not graduate early. Applications for Yearbook 1 are available HERE and must be returned to your counselor by the set deadline. [Second-year students are required to apply for and assume a position of leadership. Third-year students are required to mentor staff leaders, teach lessons, and do off-campus job shadowing as part of a year-long research project.]


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Required: 9-12) - Credit: 0.25

The Physical Education program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to acquire a wide range of skills and understand concepts that will prepare them for maintaining a lifetime of personal fitness and participation in sport activities.

Three times a quarter, students in good standing have the opportunity to choose an elective unit for participation. Units will consist of team and individual sport activities with an emphasis on building fitness levels. During some units students will have the opportunity to choose to “Walk for Fitness”.

CONDITIONING / FITNESS P.E. (9-12) - Credit: 0.25

This Physical Education elective is designed for students who wish to improve their physical fitness levels through a variety of fitness training exercises; including weightlifting, cardiovascular endurance, plyometrics and various other activities. The conditioning/fitness program will be structured for the development of individual personal fitness. Students commit to the class for a full semester. Students must pass this class with a ‘C’ or better to re-enroll in the course.

SUMMER SCHOOL JUNIOR / SENIOR PE (11-12) - Credit: 0.25

Juniors and seniors may take physical education during the summer to fulfill the PE requirement for the regular school year. Students must fulfill the requirement the summer prior to waiving PE during the regular school year. This option will help students who wish to take a heavier course load.

Students may waive their PE class when:

  1. They have a medical waiver:
    • Students will be exempt from PE who have a signed doctor’s note on file in the guidance office stating the reason for a medical exemption.
    • The doctor’s note determines the length of time a student is exempt.
    • Failure to return to PE when a medical waiver ends will result in an "F" grade for each day missed, and the student could fail PE for the semester.
    • Students out of PE for more than two weeks will be placed in a study hall.
  2. They are a Junior or Senior involved in ongoing participation in an interscholastic athletic program or marching band.
    • Juniors and Seniors waived out of PE for sports or band will stay out of PE for the remainder of that semester.
    • Students may not waive PE if the waiver would give them a third study hall. Likewise, Juniors and Seniors who have two study halls and drop a class will lose their PE waiver and be placed in a PE class.

Students have the responsibility of informing their counselor when dropping a sport, band, or the medical waiver and must return to PE immediately. Failure to return to PE when the sport or band is dropped or a medical waiver ends will result in an ‘F’ grade for each day missed, and the student could fail PE for the semester.

DRIVER EDUCATION

  • Driver Education is scheduled according to each student’s birth date and class schedule.
  • A student must pass 8 academic classes the previous 2 semesters to be eligible (this is a state law).
  • Thirty hours of classroom instruction and 6 hours of behind-the-wheel instruction are required to be eligible to take the IL driver’s license test.
  • A student will attend nine weeks of Driver Education classroom and nine weeks of PE the semester he is scheduled for Driver Education.
  • New state law requires the student to drive for nine months with a permit before getting a driver’s license.
  • Cost: $300, payable at the time students start Behind-the-Wheel instruction.
  • Behind-the-Wheel instruction is given outside of normal school day hours and may be given during the summer depending on the student’s birth date.

DRIVER EDUCATION (9-12) - Credit: 0.0

Driver Education is designed to help a student develop an awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of traffic safety. This is a two part course consisting of thirty (30+) hours of classroom instruction and six (6+) hours of behind the wheel experience. After successfully completing both phases of Driver Education, including the 9 month permit law, the student will be entitled at age 16 to take the test for an Illinois driver's license.

SUMMER SCHOOL DRIVER EDUCATION (2002 birth date) - Credit: 0.0



SPECIAL EDUCATION

The following courses are taught by special education staff and are open only to students with qualifying needs and Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s). While these courses meet requirements for graduation from Mahomet-Seymour High School, they are NOT accepted by most colleges and universities or the NCAA. Students with special needs who are planning to attend college should enroll in mainstream courses whenever possible.

INDIVIDUALIZED ENGLISH 1 (9) - Credit: 1.0

This course focuses on the remediation of reading and writing skills and is designed for students with IEP’s whose skills are below grade level expectations. This course focuses on systematic, research-based instruction using multisensory activities to build content background, vocabulary, comprehension skills, and fluency. Students also learn to organize thoughts and communicate effectively in writing. (Level C.)

INDIVIDUALIZED ENGLISH 2 (10) - Credit: 1.0

A continuation of the program used in Individualized English 1. (Level D.)

INDIVIDUALIZED ENGLISH 3 (11) - Credit: 1.0

A continuation of the program used in Individualized English 1 & 2. (Level E.)

INDIVIDUALIZED ENGLISH 4 (12) - Credit: 1.0

A continuation of the program used in Individualized English 1, 2 & 3. (Level F.)

INDIVIDUALIZED SPEECH (9-12) - Credit: 0.5

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the various aspects of both speech communication and listening. Emphasis will be placed on non-verbal communication, preparing and giving speeches and small group communication. Social skills, including conflict resolution, are addressed.

INDIVIDUALIZED CONSUMER MATH (9-12) - Credit: 1.0

These courses focus on the math aspect of independent living. Students will develop math skills associated with independent living. Three main focus areas are money, time and measurement.

INDIVIDUALIZED MATH TOPICS (9-12) - Credit: 1.0

This course is patterned after the mainstream math courses of Pre-Algebra, Algebra, and Geometry, but the rate of the course and levels of work required are tailored to individual student needs.

INDIVIDUALIZED BIOLOGY (9-10) - Credit: 1.0

The purpose of this course is to show the student how to develop basic laboratory skills and scientific methods of solving problems. The student will also be made more aware of himself as an organism and his relationship with other organisms and the environment.

INDIVIDUALIZED EARTH SCIENCE (9-12) - Credit 1.0

This course is patterned after the mainstream Earth Science course, but instructional and assessment methods are tailored to individual student needs. Units covered include: the Earth inside and out, rocks, volcanoes, atmosphere, oceans, weather, climate, stars, and galaxies.

INDIVIDUALIZED WORLD GEOGRAPHY (9-10) - Credit: 0.5

This class may be taught within the general education World Geography class or as an individualized class, depending on student needs. The class follows the same curriculum (See World Geography). The material is adapted to meet individual needs.

INDIVIDUALIZED US HISTORY (R11) - Credit: 1.0

This class may be taught within the general education U.S. History class or as an individualized class, depending on student needs. The class follows the same curriculum. The material is adapted to meet individual needs. A U.S. Constitution exam and an Illinois Constitution exam are administered in U.S. History. By state law, students must pass both constitution exams in addition to passing the course itself in order to graduate.

INDIVIDUALIZED HEALTH (R9) - Credit: 0.5

This class is taught within the general education Health class and follows the same curriculum. The material is adapted to meet individual needs.

SECONDARY TRANSITION EXPERIENCE PROGRAM (STEP)  (11-12) - Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite: Vocational Coordinator approval

The STEP program provides students with an opportunity to work at a job for school credit. The job may be on school property, in the community as a non-paying job shadow experience, or as a regular employed and paid position.  Requirements include successfully obtaining and maintaining a job, completing a quarterly evaluation with their teacher and employer, turning in a pay stub each month, and filling out required paperwork.  Entry into the program does not guarantee paid employment but does result in a small stipend which is paid monthly.


SUMMER SCHOOL


 

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